What's the most expensive thing in your closet?
 
You might be picturing your prized Prada bag, but wardrobe consultant Pattie Jamison would say it's more likely to be that sweater that's just a little too bold for your complexion, or that jacket that you've been waiting to come back in style.
 
Each time you try these items on just to discard them for a different outfit, or have to push them aside to find your favorite things, it costs valuable time.
 
Busy women rarely find the time to stroll through the mall or to completely overhaul their closets. That may be why Jamison and her sister, Martina Jamison, have successfully offered a service since 2002 that helps women with such style needs.
 
The Jamison sisters, Terrace Park natives who now live in Hyde Park and Indian Hill, are the local sales associates of Worth, a company that sells upscale clothing — scarves and leather belts start around $125, and suits are around $700 — via its sales associates' homes nationwide. This type of shopping offers customers more privacy, convenience and personal service than they're likely to find at the mall.
 
"If they don't think it looks great, I don't want them wearing it," Pattie Jamison says of her customers. "You don"t find that at stores in the mall or even at boutiques. They won't give you that honest appraisal."
 
The women of Worth focus on giving their customers what they call "nvestment clothing." These clothes will last for years and can be updated easily with future collections, which are released by Worth four times a year.
 
Trunk shows are just the beginning of the Jamison sisters' services. Knowing their customers' body types, lifestyles, and what they already own is crucial to helping build their wardrobes. If you're already a Worth customer, you can also pay for Pattie or Martina to come to your home and go through your closet for you for an additional $75 an hour.
 
Sometimes, having the approval of a professional is just what people need to finally let go of the items that they don't wear anymore — "we don't have any emotional attachment to the clothes," Pattie points out.