BEST of the
BEST
 
Professors Inspire Students
and Colleagues Alike
 

Cincy Magazine's Outstanding Educators Class of 2013 features exceptional professors who are among the many nominations from students and colleagues. Those nominations single out the winners for a variety of traits that range from scholarship to spending extra time with students, from innovation in the classroom to research.

"” THE EDITORS

 AND THE 2013 WINNERS ARE ...
 
 

Pamilla Ball
Chemistry
Northern Kentucky University

John Ballard
Management
College of Mount St. Joseph

Tim Bryant
Executive Director for Ethical Leadership
College of Mount St. Joseph

Steven Depoe
Communications
University of Cincinnati

Rodney D'Souza
Management
Northern Kentucky University

Shannon Eastep
Education
Northern Kentucky University

Kelly Edmondson
English
DeVry University

Christian End
Psychology
Xavier University

John Fairfield
History
Xavier University

Gwen Fields
Chemistry
Northern Kentucky University

Matt Flick
Graphic Design
School of Advertising Art

Tamara Giluk
Management and Entrepreneurship
Xavier University

 

J. Marc Hopkins
Business and Information Technology
DeVry University

David Hyland
Finance
Xavier University

Keith King
Health
University of Cincinnati

Patrick Kumpf
Education
University of Cincinnati

Chet Laine
Secondary Education
University of Cincinnati

Laura Padolik
Chemistry
Northern Kentucky University

Vijay Raghavan
Information Systems
Northern Kentucky University

Meg Riestenberg
Science
College of Mount St. Joseph

Peter Robinson
History
College of Mount St. Joseph

Traian Truta
Computer Science
Northern Kentucky University

Sandra Turkelson
Nursing
Northern Kentucky University

Matthew Westgate
Music
Xavier University

 
EDUCATION UPDATE 2013
 
COLLEGE OF MOUNT ST. JOSEPH

5701 Delhi Road
Cincinnati, OH 45233
(513) 244-4200
www.msj.edu
 
 The College of Mount St. Joseph accommodates busy lifestyles with flexible scheduling, prior learning credits, off-site programs and career-focused fields of study. Not only do we cater to adult students earning a degree to change careers or advance their careers, but we also offer nine graduate programs, including a Master of Science in Organizational Leadership (MSOL)
 
The Master of Science in Organizational Leadership is a multi-disciplinary masters program that focuses on values-based leadership. The MSOL program is unique in its departure from the standard MBA, offering courses in leadership through ethics, decision-making, relationships and technology. The program mirrors the Mount's commitment to interdisciplinary education with a focus on career preparation while emphasizing values, integrity and social responsibility for effective leadership in all types of organizations. Learn more at www.msj.edu/msol.


 

 
WINNER PROFILES
By Helen Cary
 
TIM BRYANT
COLLEGE OF MOUNT ST. JOSEPH
 
Tim Bryant's mission statement is simple: a strong belief in ethics not only makes people better, it improves the communities where they live.

The Executive Director of the Ethical Leadership Initiative has collaborated with colleagues in bringing ethical leadership development to life at the school.

"The challenge of finding common ground between administrative, academic and student developments, as well as garnering support of numerous community partners to work together, has been very fulfilling to me," he says.

Bryant brings national speakers to the college for the Discussions of Leadership lecture series. He has also invited Better Business Bureau Torch Award winners to campus to discuss marketplace business ethics with students.
 
 
 
Kelly Edmondson
DeVry University

Kelly Edmondson knows the value of balance in a busy life. As a professor of English and Composition, she creates lesson plans to make an environment that is motivating, challenging and engaging.

In the classroom, she offers a variety of activities to stimulate interest and to make sure each student's learning needs are met. Activities include group discussions, individual and group writing assignments, and mini-lessons.

However, being a working mother with two sets of twins, ages 7 and 9, has made Edmondson more disciplined.

"I stay organized by mentally going through each day while I run in the morning and also writing everything down in my daily calendar," Edmondson says, explaining her first strategy for balancing a career and family.
 
 
JOHN FAIRFIELD
XAVIER UNIVERSITY

John Fairfield is determined to have students become familiar and oriented with where they live during their college days.

In his Writing in Public course, he encourages students to become ecologically informed citizens, with the goal of learning a sense of place wherever they choose to live. Fairfield says it is important to make a commitment to a place.

"The place doesn't, obviously, have to be Cincinnati, and it doesn't necessarily have to be a lifelong commitment or one made early in life. But I do think it's good to sink roots and make an important contribution to a community."

Fairfield also strives to connect with students on a personal level. "I'm pleased they find me still engaged enough in life that they believe I have something useful to say to them about their hopes and fears, plans and aspirations."

 
 EDUCATION UPDATE 2013
 
Great Oaks Career Campuses
3254 e. Kemper road
Cincinnati 45241
(513) 771-8840
Www.Greatoaks.Com
 

Great Oaks is a public school district offering opportunities for high school students and adults to become certified in a career field and get ready to work. More than 40 high school programs and 17 adult programs are available at four campuses "” Diamond Oaks in Dent, Laurel Oaks in Wilmington, Live Oaks in Milford and Scarlet Oaks in Sharonville.

Career program fields for adults include auto collision technology, aviation maintenance (powerplant technician), EKG technician, electro-mechanical maintenance, firefighting/EMT, Ford ASSET automotive technology, health professions, HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning), industrial diesel mechanics, law enforcement, medical office specialist, pharmacy technician, phlebotomy, plumbing, practical nursing, private security and welding. Programs typically begin in the fall, but applicants are encouraged to apply in the spring to complete pre-enrollment testing and to ensure a place in the program.
 
 
KEITH KING
UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI
 
People know sincerity when they see it. Keith King was described as a person who genuinely cares for his students. The program director of Health Promotion and Education, has taught a wide range of health-related classes.

King believes that the most effective teaching style is an authoritative approach. "This (approach) entails an educator who sets high expectations with his or her students and who demonstrates a high level of support and care for students."

Included in his curriculum is a range of insightful and thought-provoking assignments. These include small group activities and discussion as well as becoming involved in interactive projects like volunteering at a soup kitchen.

"I try to get my students to exit their comfort zones and extend their learning by establishing high goals of which I am there to help them achieve," he says.

 
PATRICK KUMPF
UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI

Patrick Kumpf is a professor whose teaching style and demeanor allows him to connect with traditional and non-traditional students. "I suppose I am an even-keeled professor," he says. "I listen carefully ... recognize the different ability of students as well as the different learning styles. I trust my students to do the right thing."

Kumpf, who has taught at UC for more than 40 years, is currently an associate professor of Information Technology. He has taught many courses, including Fundamentals of Information Technology and Senior Design Project Management. In addition, he was an associate dean for student services, interim department head and faculty adviser for the Information Technology Student Association. "I find my students to be interesting and generally eager to learn."
 
 
LAURA PADOLIK
Northern Kentucky University
 
Laura Padolik has transformed the general chemistry lab courses from the traditional "follow-the-directions" lab to students conducting their own step-by-step experiments in groups. In turn, the students submit their proposals and written reports to hypothetical companies in which they explain their experiments and results.

"I had read about "¢inquiry based learning' in journal articles and heard about it at meetings, and thought this would be a great way to challenge both my students and myself," says Padolik about how she came up with the idea.

She says there are many benefits to this approach.

"I believe that this will help our students become better problem solvers. "¢Real world' problems seldom come with a set of step-by-step instructions that lead to solutions."