Schaaf: I believe the projection of 30 percent is relatively accurate if you account for the wide variety of digital media being included in integrated marketing communications plans today. These placements include such media as banners, pay-per-click search engine marketing, e-newsletters, blogs, podcasts, webinars, etc. Because of the variety of digital advertising solutions, media professionals today have a much greater number of outlets to reach potential consumers.

Spak: The bigger question is, how are you defining new media? I think 30 percent is a stretch, considering that internet advertising comprises about 5 percent of total advertising expenditures, even though people spend as much as 20 percent or more of their "media time" with their computers. Again, going back to the semantics, I think it is terribly limiting to reduce this discussion to something about traditional versus new media. With consumers taking greater control over what they take in, it will be critical for marketers and agencies to understand that it is meaningful engagement with wary consumers that will win the day.

Slattery: In our world, we don't expect any more than 10 percent of spending to shift to new media. As a support arm for many franchise or dealer brands, our customers tend to be more conservative in making significant changes to media strategy. Our business helps advertisers focus on what media channels truly drive leads/sales on a daily basis. I don't feel like Telestar would be doing its job properly if its media mix changed 30 percent in a given year"¦but that's our world.

Barnett: That number (30 percent) may seem high to some, but we don't doubt its accuracy. In fact, by some accounts that's modest. As the highly desired techno-savvy consumers evolve and make the internet, blogging, smart phones, podcasts, vodcasts and the like a part of their daily routine, advertisers will follow.

Krienik: If you are trying to make an industry-wide statement I think 30 percent is way over-inflated. Industry-wide averages for new media as a percent of total media spending was about 3 percent in 2006. To assume that consumers all use new media the same way, regardless of the product, is a big mistake.

HOW DO YOU INTEGRATE RADIO, TV AND PRINT INTO A NEW MEDIA SCHEDULE? ARE YOU BUYING IT ALL? OR IS IT BEING SPLIT UP WITHIN YOUR IN-HOUSE SPECIALTIES?

Barnett: Campaigns are easily"”and effectively"”integrated into new media. The fact that consumers "choose" to hear/see the message is a tremendous advantage. A willing, captive audience is far more receptive. We have seen a decline in the effectiveness of print advertising (more specifically, newspaper), so we have focused more of our attention on electronic media. As we have recognized the growing interest and relevance of new media, we have formed partnerships with new media "manufacturing" entities and are exploring a variety of applications.

Krienik: Just like with new media, our research determines consumers' usage of each media in their decision-making process. Once you know the mix that the consumer uses, it's very simple to develop a more effective plan"¦one that goes way beyond the traditional and outdated methods of relying on non-specific client data, like Nielson and Arbitron. With our clients, we can tell you what percentage watch Fox 19 News at 10 p.m., how many subscribe to the daily vs. the Sunday Enquirer, as well as what browser they use and the key words they used for their search.

Roeser: It's typically a matter of properly timing event splashes or special programs so when the paid media is running on television or radio or online, it coordinates with rich media: the public relations/buzz marketing currently ongoing that, in the case of Eisen Management Group, is driving the advertising schedules. We utilize paid [media] to leverage public relations activities such as events, promotions, media junkets and even publicity. For example, radio buys can be used to drive key traffic to the web site to sign up for a newsletter, watch a video or sign up to attend a speaking engagement"”all of which can be used to capture valuable target information.

Slattery: We believe there is a time and a place for everything based on budget, objective and assets. We also believe you need to constantly explore new things. We keep an open mind in planning and craft media strategies based on what we're working with and what we need to accomplish. In our world, new media is incorporated into current strategy in order to keep fresh targets in the mix and to test new channels. It's all about getting better every day.

SOME SAY THAT THE :30 TV SPOT IS A DYING BREED. TRUE? NOT TRUE? OR WILL ITS IMPORTANCE GROW AS ADVERTISERS NEED TO REACH A MASS AUDIENCE AND DRIVE THE REAL PROSPECTS TO NEW MEDIA?

Roeser: Not true, but the need to reach a mass audience is a dying breed. The markets are increasingly segmented. The need to reach key influencers, and drive action among best customers and establish trial and new loyalty among new customers, is key. Although there will probably always be a time to reach a mass audience, with the advent of TiVo and the like, many consumers"”particularly those 40 and under"”record the programs they desire and simply fast forward and/or tune out from the 30 second spot. I see much of television advertising actually going back to some of the "golden era" sponsorships like the Texaco Comedy Hour, or game shows sponsored by Revlon or, for instance, the Hallmark Hall of Fame"”same idea.

Spak: There is a place for everything depending upon the brand strategy. TV is still an incredibly powerful medium"¦it still has the power to move and inspire. I think there will be a time not too far in the future where viewers will have the opportunity to select those commercials they like for additional viewing. The best TV commercials tell a compelling story. Why wouldn't people want to watch them for entertainment?

Fischer: The TV spot is most definitely not dead. It is still vitally important to many of our clients, but it doesn't exist in a vacuum anymore. There are so many other creative elements that, when used in conjunction with TV spots, only make a campaign stronger. Secondly, TV spots are going to have to get better. The age of the "logical functional" sell has lost out to emotion. Let's face it: Consumers can pick and choose whatever media they want, and to really reach them your message had better be entertaining and compelling. I see a rebirth of creativity in all areas.

Barnett: We don't think the :30 TV spot is going away. We've seen a major uprising of :10s and :15s, but we think there will always be room for the traditional :30. Certain advertisers can't use a spot less than :30 because they can't say what needs to be said in less time. [Spots that are] :10 and :15  should be used primarily for branding.

HOW DOES ONE GET TO A "MOMENT OF TRUTH" ON A WEB SITE VERSUS A TV SPOT?

Church: I think it's limiting to think about one "moment of truth." There are many moments and many truths. Anything can and will affect people's opinion of your brand. The need to make it immediate and relevant is always there, regardless of what the touch-point is.

HOW HAS THE SIZE OF THE MONITOR, THE SIZE OF THE SPEAKERS, THE PRODUCTION VALUES ON A COMPUTER MONITOR OR EVEN AN iPOD OR A PDA AFFECTED THE CREATIVE PUNCH OF THE ADVERTISING THERE?

Church: If they can't see it or hear it or feel it, it's hard to experience it — so of course device constraints are valid problems for everyone. But let's not forget that nobody is looking to consume most of what is being transmitted in the first place. The key is to re-think it rather than try to just adapt the TV spot. Go back to the strategy and ask what is the best way to deliver the message to that particular medium. Where's the opportunity? How can we drive this campaign to someone with a tin can and a string? A lot of times this can result in some pretty interesting work, work that's got a lot more impact and immediacy than a TV spot.

WITH ADVERTISING MOVING TO NEW MEDIA, ARE YOU ADAPTING YOUR CREATIVE MESSAGES OR DEVELOPING ALL-NEW MESSAGING?

Slattery: We think we're pretty good at what we do. We also think we do things the right way. We're not going to do anything too differently than what we've done in the past, which is to say we're going to continue to focus on driving leads for customers while exploring new media channels that further increase ROI. You always have to adapt your creative message to the media you're using.

Fischer: Agencies that can't figure out how to design and execute a creative process that naturally integrates all media and disciplines will not be here tomorrow. Evolve or die. We're confident we've figured it out.

Schaaf: With the increased importance of using new media, as an advertising agency we need to stay on the cutting edge of technology and continue to develop creative concepts that can be executed across the different media outlets available to us. The fundamentals of developing a core message and strategy are never going to die; we just need to make sure that a message can be translated efficiently to all media formats. The trick is finding those people who have the creative talent to translate a core message across multiple advertising platforms.

Krienik: I prefer to think about it as new media is an additional tool in our media tool box. Traditional media either is very limiting in the amount of content you can deliver (e.g., 30 seconds on radio and TV) or you pay for the amount of content (e.g., cost per column inch in newspaper). Client web sites have virtually no limit on the amount of content you can publish, with no significant media cost associated with a large amount of content.

Having 25 years experience designing outdoor billboards has proven to be a distinct advantage for this agency. Our skill set has transferred very nicely to the development of effective banner ads.

MORE AND MORE, COMPANIES ARE USING DIGITAL BILLBOARDS FOR ADVERTISING. WHO DRIVES NEW TECH DEVELOPMENTS: MAJOR CLIENTS OR MAJOR TECHNOLOGY PROVIDERS?

Fahey: Advertisers are demanding quicker turnaround on installation, and in proof of performance. Digital technology provides instantaneous installation, and immediate proof of performance. To that degree it has gone beyond many advertisers ability to use all the flexibility that is available with this exciting technology. Lamar's digital displays allow advertisers to develop an ad and have it running almost immediately after finalizing the artwork, and without any additional production cost.

Swormstedt: The technology has spawned independently of market needs, and the providers are still trying to figure out what to do with it. Speaking for the on-premise sign industry, I'd say "the box" is everything to an electric sign company. The resulting message is irrelevant. To the purchasers, however, content is king, and the "box" is just a detail. When I attended the Digital Retailing Expo in Chicago in 2005, I found that electronic digital signage (EDS) was everywhere, but to me seemed nothing more than a sea of televisions in the form of point-of-purchase (POP) mechanisms. Essentially, advertisers are needing to be coerced.

WHAT'S NEXT? BUSINESSES UTILIZING INTERACTIVE DISPLAYS WITH CONTENT FOR CONSUMERS? ADVERTISING THAT CHANGES DEPENDING ON THE TIME OF DAY OR A CHANGE IN THE WEATHER?

Swormstedt: What's next is simply more and more billboards going digital. It's already common practice for stores with EDS to change messages based on the time of day. For example, a grocery store may display sales notices for laundry detergent during the middle of the day, and maybe takeout dinner specials for the drive-home rush-hour traffic.

Outdoor boards can get demographic info about vehicular traffic and adjust their ads accordingly. Norton Outdoor Advertising plans to soon add five EDS boards locally. Overall, there are approximately 400 EDS billboards in the United States, with several hundred thousand total billboards.

Fahey: Bluetooth technology is available now that will allow billboards to talk to individual consumers, but this is more for pedestrian traffic, and probably will not be featured in Cincinnati. In this market I see digital technology as a great opportunity for advertisers to [impart] their messages, or to tailor the message for the specific day or hour. During the last snowfall that paralyzed the city during the morning commute, Ford immediately switched the regularly scheduled ad for an ad touting the Explorer SUV. This gave Ford the perfect platform to showcase the snow performance of the Explorer.

WHAT IS CINCINNATI'S STAKE IN A CHANGING MEDIA WORLD?

Fischer: It remains to be seen, but I believe interactive media will be a growing force in Cincinnati agencies. It allows agencies to reinvent and find new clients.

Roeser: As we attract more talent and more business to our city, we collectively make a larger impact to the media world. But I believe very honestly that there are some incredibly talented people in this city and that do it as well, if not better and certainly at better pricing, than our coastal counterparts. I believe we should play on our Midwest segment. So often in politics you hear about Ohio and how pivotal our state is because "as Ohio goes, so goes the nation." I believe that can be true in advertising and public relations as more and more clients look to reach out to "reality" and to continue to define core targets and core America.

Spak: It's the same as any other city's stake. The web has truly "flattened" the game (to borrow from Thomas Friedman), and we can all compete as equals given the fact that a great idea does not have a zip code attached to it.

HOW DOES A PROMOTIONAL AGENCY WORK WITH A CLIENT TODAY? MUST TRADITIONAL COUPONS WORK WITH ONLINE COUPONS?

Church: Promotion is a lot tougher due in part to the growth in the quantity and fragmentation of outlets. Add the client's demand for metrics and it's tougher still"¦We have to look at the desired response function that the client wants, then figure out a way to produce this from as many different pieces and angles that make sense. It has to work together, but it all certainly doesn't have to be the same.